Pauline Hadaway

Publications

Women Co-operators in the years following The Great War

November 4, 2015 Comments Off on Women Co-operators in the years following The Great War

Event Title: Days of Hope: Women Co-operators in the years following the First World War.
Venue: The Learning Loft, Rochdale Pioneers Museum, Toad Lane, Rochdale, Lancs.
Time: Thursday 12 November at 3-5 pm.

With the future of politics to be ‘decided in the social, economic and industrial circumstances brought upon us by war’, the Co-operators’ Yearbook reminded its readers that the ‘crowning fact’ of 1918 had been the extension of the parliamentary vote to women over the age of thirty. As property restrictions were abolished, the British electorate more than doubled to 21 million, including 8.5 million newly enfranchised women. In this ‘tidal wave of democracy’, the Co-operators’ Yearbook looked forward to a future in which people would regain control of their lives, reclaim ‘civil liberties and customary rights’ and take responsibility for organising society and the economy on their own terms and in their own interests.

Pauline Hadaway, Researcher in Residence with the National Co-operative Archive, has been exploring the Co-operators’ Yearbooks (1917-1922) to discover the contribution of women co-operators to the project of rebuilding society and the economy as Britain emerged from the turmoil of the Great War. From grassroots initiatives and campaigns to international movements what were these new political actors thinking, writing, making and doing during the brief ‘days of hope’ that followed war, revolution and the collapse of the old world order?

Join Pauline to hear about some early findings and take part in a conversation exploring her research interests, in the light of the social, cultural and political currents that shaped the post World War One world. Aimed at anyone with a relevant interest or knowledge, whether academic or personal, the event is an opportunity to contribute ideas, thoughts, personal knowledge and stories or simply to find out more about a research project at an early stage of development. All are welcome.

Policing the Public Gaze

December 3, 2012 Comments Off on Policing the Public Gaze

Policing the Public Gaze: The Assault on Citizen Photography, by Pauline Hadaway, director of Belfast Exposed gallery, reveals the growing restriction of citizen photography – by community safety wardens, private security guards, and self-appointed ‘jobsworths’.

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Recent Publications

May 21, 2011 Comments Off on Recent Publications

Relaunching Titanic: Memory and Marketing in the New Belfast

Relaunching Titanic critically considers the invocation of Titanic heritage in Belfast in contributing to a new ‘post-conflict’ understanding of the city. The authors address how the memory of Titanic is being and should be represented in the place of its origin, from where it was launched into the collective consciousness and unconscious of western civilization.

Click here to view the book on Amazon

Policing the Public Gaze: The Assault on Citizen Photography

March 10, 2011 Comments Off on Policing the Public Gaze: The Assault on Citizen Photography

Pauline Hadaway reveals the growing restriction of citizen photography – by community safety wardens, private security guards, and self-appointed ‘jobsworths’.

This ranges from children being told that they can only take photos of particular parts of the body, to sports clubs told they should remove all photos of kids from their websites.

Hadaway argues that it is important that people are able to take spontaneous photographs of public life, whether of children or any other contemporary touchy subjects: ‘We need to stop this self-censorship.’

http://www.manifestoclub.com/photographyreport