Pauline Hadaway

Author: Pauline Hadaway

My professional interest in researching Northern Irish cultural policy

September 17, 2015 Comments Off on My professional interest in researching Northern Irish cultural policy

My interest in this area arises from my own professional experience as a cultural manager negotiating the complexities of cultural development and policy implementation in Northern Ireland.

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PhD research abstract on Cultural Policy and Peace Building

September 17, 2015 Comments Off on PhD research abstract on Cultural Policy and Peace Building

Whilst the arts and culture remain relatively insignificant in terms of direct government spending, cultural policy has extended its influence across wide areas of social and economic policy-making in the whole of the UK over the past three decades.

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Escaping the Panopticon

February 6, 2015 Comments Off on Escaping the Panopticon

On Budget Day 2012, photographer and film maker @indyrikki was in Parliament Square taking pictures of UK Uncut demonstrators being moved on by the Police[1].

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Re-imagining Titanic, re-imaging Belfast

September 19, 2013 Comments Off on Re-imagining Titanic, re-imaging Belfast

Speaking in the immediate aftermath of the sinking of the Titanic, a survivor spoke of her incredulity on deck as the tragedy unfolded: ‘It was like a play, like a drama that was being enacted for entertainment, it did not seem real.’

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Creative Choices – Arts and Arts Management

December 3, 2012 Comments Off on Creative Choices – Arts and Arts Management

An interview with Pauline about developing a career in arts management
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Policing the Public Gaze

December 3, 2012 Comments Off on Policing the Public Gaze

Policing the Public Gaze: The Assault on Citizen Photography, by Pauline Hadaway, director of Belfast Exposed gallery, reveals the growing restriction of citizen photography – by community safety wardens, private security guards, and self-appointed ‘jobsworths’.

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No Surrender to the Censors

December 2, 2012 Comments Off on No Surrender to the Censors

Belfast City Council arts subcommittee passed a vote of censure against the Vacuum, a local arts and cultural review, following a complaint that it contained material which was offensive to Christians.

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Recent Publications

May 21, 2011 Comments Off on Recent Publications

Relaunching Titanic: Memory and Marketing in the New Belfast

Relaunching Titanic critically considers the invocation of Titanic heritage in Belfast in contributing to a new ‘post-conflict’ understanding of the city. The authors address how the memory of Titanic is being and should be represented in the place of its origin, from where it was launched into the collective consciousness and unconscious of western civilization.

Click here to view the book on Amazon


Policing the Public Gaze: The Assault on Citizen Photography

March 10, 2011 Comments Off on Policing the Public Gaze: The Assault on Citizen Photography

Pauline Hadaway reveals the growing restriction of citizen photography – by community safety wardens, private security guards, and self-appointed ‘jobsworths’.

This ranges from children being told that they can only take photos of particular parts of the body, to sports clubs told they should remove all photos of kids from their websites.

Hadaway argues that it is important that people are able to take spontaneous photographs of public life, whether of children or any other contemporary touchy subjects: ‘We need to stop this self-censorship.’

http://www.manifestoclub.com/photographyreport


Lost in the Maze

February 18, 2011 Comments Off on Lost in the Maze

Speaking in the wake of last month’s tragic spate of suicides in north Belfast, Irish President Mary McAleese blamed the peace process for failing young people in Northern Ireland, parts of which, she said, remained ‘stuck in a time warp’ of sectarianism and paramilitarism, where, in the context of rising prosperity across Ireland, levels of poverty were often ‘worse than during the Troubles’.

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